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By Imogen Sara Smith | November 18, 2014
At the Museum

“A singular being in a plural world” is how Jean Cocteau described the French director Jean Grémillon. His films are sensitive to the tensions between individuals and communities, between the cyclical patterns of daily life and the private obsessions or conflicts that break these rhythms.

review
By Nick Pinkerton | November 20, 2014

A thought that occurred to me while watching Albert Serra’s Story of My Death: the lot of filmmakers traveling the prestige Euro festival circuit is not incomparable to that of the itinerant gentleman of prerevolutionary Europe.

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By Genevieve Yue | November 14, 2014
Festival Dispatch

Berlin oder ein Traum mit Sahne (Berlin or a Dream with Cream), The Measures, Seven Signs That Mean Silence, Letters to Max, Babash, Ming of Harlem: Twenty One Storeys in the Air, Broken Tongue, Sugarcoated Arsenic, The Dragon Is the Frame

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By Nick Pinkerton | November 14, 2014

This may be difficult to believe today, but there was for a moment a sense that Carrey was an actually dangerous, destabilizing force.

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By Michael Koresky | November 12, 2014

Bennett Miller’s bleakly efficient film is not only about America. It’s also about masculinity, brotherhood, fatherhood, class, competition, the drive for self-definition and expression. (It’s about just about everything except, of course, women, save one looming, destructive mother figure.)

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By Eric Hynes, Jeff Reichert | November 12, 2014

In this Reverse Shot Talkie, host Eric Hynes takes filmmaker Robert Greene for a walk along the East River to talk about his new film, Actress (out now from Cinema Guild).

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By Nick Pinkerton | November 11, 2014

The first thing that you should know before watching Tommy Lee Jones’s The Homesman is that it operates under the fundamental assumption that everyone who took part in the settling of the American West was, by almost any contemporary standard, insane.

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By Adam Nayman | November 7, 2014

Christopher Nolan usually makes movies about characters who are prisoners of their own devices, which makes Interstellar a departure. This time out, a protagonist’s single-minded obsession leads him to liberation rather than entrapment.

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By Nick Pinkerton | November 6, 2014
At the Museum

An inventory of just about everything that the cinema could do in the year 1931, quite a lot of which still outlines its capabilities today.

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By Max Nelson | November 5, 2014

It is, I think, this impulse to account for the form of finished objects—to think through the circumstances under which they were made, the material limitations of their production, and the needs they were created to fill—that leads Wiseman to take the interest he does in the day-to-day business of institutional administration.

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Isle of the Dead, Twilight Zone: the Movie, Eyes Without a Face, Candyman, Night of the Demon, Black Sunday, The Babadook

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By Jeff Reichert | October 31, 2014

The intellectual questions in nonfiction of late have swirled around hybridity and exploding forms, but hopefully in the wake of CITIZENFOUR we’ll be refocused on the basics of filmmaking: Poitras has crafted a real-life thriller more energetic than Kathryn Bigelow’s infinitely higher budgeted Zero Dark Thirty.

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By Brendan Keogh | October 30, 2014
Touching the Screen

Every single stroke is added to that overall score; your overall score is always the total number of strokes you have performed. Short of deleting the game’s data and reinstalling it, there are no restarts, no practicing. Just you and the desert in a constant march forward.

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By Michael Koresky | October 28, 2014

By its nature, 3D only functions if the apparatus used to record its images and the human eyes there to receive those images all work in tandem. What happens, Goodbye to Language wonders, when even that breaks down, yet the pretense of 3D remains?

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By Jeff Reichert | October 27, 2014

The Wolf of Wall Street is perhaps the most despicable, entertaining, and despicably entertaining film we’ve yet seen from Scorsese, plunging headlong into the excess surrounding Belfort’s meteoric, hedonistic rise and pillow-soft landing.