symposium
By Michael Koresky, Jeff Reichert | September 17, 2014

For such an icon, Scorsese is fairly tricky to pin down. What threads, if any, connect his various, distinctive films? Is he more fascinating a director because of commonalities between his films or divergences?
Check back for new articles daily!

symposium
By Matt Connolly | September 23, 2014

Female experience is a fraught and contradictory thing in Alice, established within a matrix of domestic responsibilities, culturally influenced fantasies, and conflicting social expectations regarding the proper relationship between a woman’s desires and duties.

symposium
By Jeff Reichert | September 22, 2014

In its almost bratty simplicity it shows up so many contemporary nonfiction films, which often seem to exist only to document the exemplary or the culturally notable, and in their slavish obsession with their subjects’ import end up squelching the kind of resonance that Italianamerican casually exudes.

symposium
By Jordan Cronk | September 19, 2014

It was the instinctive, holistically integrated flourishes of Mean Streets that would construct a working model for much of Scorsese’s future output.

video

All these years later we’re still thinking about A.I. and how the film manages to engender so much human empathy while remaining an essentially cold, remote work largely told from the point of view of robots.

feature

If being a cinephilewatching, thinking, talking, and writing about cinema—is at once a social and solitary activity, how could one begin to describe the paradoxical situation of an Iranian cinephile?

feature
By Brendan Keogh | September 18, 2014
Touching the Screen

The relationship between video games and film is one of love-hate in the various discourses around the two media—the creators of each often seem to both desire and reject the credibility of the other.

symposium
By Mark Asch | September 17, 2014

Many of the qualities we associate with promising student filmmakers—voraciousness, audacity, experimental flair—are qualities we continue to associate with the septuagenarian director of The Wolf of Wall Street.

symposium
By Justin Stewart | September 17, 2014

Knocking, filmed on weekends over the course of three years and subject to reshoots and name changes throughout, was conceived as the beginning of a never-completed trilogy about Scorsese’s coming of age in Little Italy.

symposium
By Kristi Mitsuda | September 17, 2014

Marginalized within her own story, Bertha nevertheless takes up a large amount of screen time, but Scorsese seems at a loss as to what to do with her. And her blankness creates a hole in the film.

review
By Nick Pinkerton | September 9, 2014

Stray Dogs is a disturbing movie, not only because Tsai denies us any period of relaxing cruise control, but because he piles one long take after another atop the viewer, as to impress a sense of the weight of time.

review
By Michael Koresky | August 19, 2014

It’s a story not of large, draconian measures that stifle human joy, but of the small, incremental decisions that lead to heartbreak, and which can make our everyday lives seem downright dystopic.

review
By Jeff Reichert | August 8, 2014

How is it that Ramon Zürcher’s beguiling, curious, deceptively slight first feature, The Strange Little Cat, seems to take place over the course of one family’s mundane afternoon, and at the same time in every possible moment in this family’s history?

review
By Max Nelson | August 7, 2014

Jealousy’s 77 whittled-down minutes play less like a single, continuous narrative than a series of isolated incidents, each enclosed by its own set of borders and calibrated to its own private sense of time.

review
By Adam Nayman | July 28, 2014

To the list of hardy souls who have tried bringing Cormac McCarthy to the screen we may now add James Franco.